Salt Dragon
Thanks to a few amazing malcontents that’s no longer what I think of when I think of bears

Why, whatever could you mean?

I’m typing up the outline for my thesis. I just added a note that “[the possibility that women artists are better represented in private collections than they are in public collections] bears investigating.” And now I have this image in my head of bears rifling through old European mansions and villas, tearing open drawers and closets in search of paintings.

what exactly would that entail?

I’m not totally sure what it would look like in practice, but we need some means of registering publicly that, independent of our feelings on Israel, that we can clearly see that antisemitism has not been eradicated, and that no gentile-dominated party, no gentile-dominated movement, no gentile-dominated state is free of it, and that we do not accept this state of affairs. The current violence in Gaza has brought this to the fore on the left, but it has also been exacerbated almost universally, and while Israel is in no danger of disappearing tomorrow, the powers that be entrenched as they are, there are Jewish communities that do face such a threat. The world must be shamed for its unwillingness to confront this issue, even as it becomes a crisis in places, and those who would politically instrumentalize us and speak for us must be told to keep their hands away.

We need Jewish solidarity rallies, not pro-Israel rallies.

fuckyeahsoftzionism:

"After glimpsing a sign that read ‘Israel=KKK,’ Shulman had had enough; he departed the line of marchers and sat down on a park bench."

I walked by the pro-Israel rally mentioned in this article last night, where attendees were chanting “IDF! IDF! IDF!” Which is chilling, to be honest. JVP and those most clearly representing the Jewish left in the street do not have their heads screwed on quite right, though.

It will never cease to amaze me how much of the language of critical theory gets absorbed into gallery press and books destined for coffee tables.

It will never cease to amaze me how much of what gets published in academic journals and under university imprints may as well be gallery press or destined for a coffee table. 

therearepeoplewho:

saltdragon:

Art history is a terrible discipline. Outside of a handful of canonical artists, a great deal of art history rests on a foam of secondary sources with little basis in the material evidence of artists’ lives and worlds.

yep. but, where critical theory is in art history/art theory/art-writing/art texts is my happy place, and it gets smothered by fluff that co-opts material evidence of artists’ lives and worlds to fit bourgeois nonsense-narratives. and by novelty fluff that, in self-contextualisation, imitates critical theory language w/o substantially applying its substance.

it will never cease to amaze me how much of the language of critical theory gets absorbed into gallery press and books destined for coffee tables.

saltdragon:

Art history is a terrible discipline. Outside of a handful of canonical artists, a great deal of art history rests on a foam of secondary sources with little basis in the material evidence of artists’ lives and worlds.

Art history today continues to mostly be connoisseurship, which should be a topic of study, but certainly not a goal of study.

Art history is a terrible discipline. Outside of a handful of canonical artists, a great deal of art history rests on a foam of secondary sources with little basis in the material evidence of artists’ lives and worlds.

In the 65 years after her death in 1842, somewhere between thirty and forty biographies and commentaries on the work of Vigée Le Brun were published. Nearly all of them cite her memoirs as a source, and many cite each other. Occasionally contemporary criticism is mentioned. A divorce document is mentioned two, possibly three times. It is not until 1908 that a scholarly biography citing private letters, documents, contracts, family papers, etc… is finally published – bringing out such details as the artist’s studio being seized for painting without a license. It would be pretty much another 65 years before anyone treated Vigée Le Brun with any kind of academic rigor again.